How I Sold 1,400 Courses in 24 Hours – Episode 2

Download the full transcript in PDF form here:

Are you excited about what you’re selling? Are you asking people to take sides? If you don’t ask people totake sides, then you don’t have a brand. In Episode 002 of Marketing Podcast Weekly, your hosts Rob Booker and Jason Pyles bring you more valuable counsel about how to market in the financial industry. During this show we talk about the effectiveness of brand response and how to convey contagious passion through your marketing messages. Join us for this episode, and we’ll tell you more!

Links for this episode:
Email your questions: business@robbooker.com
Website: marketingpodcastweekly.com

Jason’s podcasts:
MoviePodcastWeekly.com – reviews of new movies in theaters
HorrorMoviePodcast.com – where we’re Dead Serious About Horror Movies

Full Transcript 

Rob Booker:
Mr Plyes.

Jason Pyles:
Rob Booker.

Rob Booker:
Hey, I got a question for you.

Jason Pyles:
Let’s here it.

Rob Booker:
Imagine people were lining up around the street, like they are for an iPhone.

Jason Pyles:
Okay.

Rob Booker:
Just to get their greedy little hands on whatever it is that you have to sell.

Jason Pyles:
Alright. I’m excited about this.

Rob Booker:
Yeah. Just that one thought sounds spectacular.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah. I just woke up from a dream kind of like this.

Rob Booker:
Alright. So, it was probably 2012 and I was off to Arizona wine country in the car. A bunch of friends and I were all just going to drive out there. I didn’t have any interest in drinking any wine, however, they all thought we would take a day trip out there. I had spent the last month, Jason, running some Facebook ads, which I really didn’t know how to do, which I will describe in a minute, not that anybody cares, and getting ready to launch this class that I was teaching. There were a bunch of people on this early bird list for this class, but I didn’t think much of it. I had been in business for a long time before that, kind of like you, recording. What episode of the horror movie podcast are you on now?

Jason Pyles:
Oh my goodness. It’s like 150ish, somewhere around there.

Rob Booker:
Okay. So when you do your 160th episode, it won’t necessarily have any kind of feel to it, that it’s any different. It will just be episode 160. It might be a movie you really like.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
What is the best horror movie of this year, by the way?

Jason Pyles:
So far? Oh my goodness. That’s a great question. You know, I honestly can’t tell you just yet, Rob. Isn’t that terrible.

Rob Booker:
Is it possible that it will be Stephan King’s It.

Jason Pyles:
It may be. That looks really freaky.

Rob Booker:
Every time I see a movie that’s advertised on iTunes trailers or whatever, that it’s about somebody trapped inside a room.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
Or can’t get out, I think of you because I know that you like that kind of a movie.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah, I know. I’m a little bit weird.

Rob Booker:
I wouldn’t call it weird. You like what you like, right?

Jason Pyles:
That’s right. Yeah. I like other things too. Pretty much anything except musicals for the most part.

Rob Booker:
Unless it’s a horror musical.

Jason Pyles:
Well.

Rob Booker:
Which is the Sound of Music.

Jason Pyles:
Right. Exactly.

Rob Booker:
The whole movie long in the Sound of Music, I kept hoping they would get caught.

Jason Pyles:
Oh Rob. That’s just terrible. It’s terrible.

Rob Booker:
Okay. So, we’re on the way to Arizona wine country and this class goes on sale automatically, the email goes out. I have this thing set up on my phone that I’ll get an alert. I do this all the time. I have a different way of doing this every time I launch a class online, but I had this alert system that it would send me a text message every time somebody bought the class.

Jason Pyles:
Nice.

Rob Booker:
You have your phone, your ding thing, your little dinging sound on and your buzzing sound in your phone. Every time that you get a text message, your phone either vibrates or it dings or it does both. Well, I didn’t realize this, but I launched that class at something like 8 o’clock in the morning, then every second for the first hour, and then all day long, my phone just dinged and buzzed. It was a joke in the car with everybody, that some woman was texting me, which that would have been great. I don’t know, that would be a little weird if somebody was texting you that much.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
It was in the first hour, I think I sold 1400 of that course and my phone overheated. Literally, my iPhone shut down because the buzzing inside, the vibration was causing movement, which caused friction, which caused heat, which caused my phone to literally shut down because of the heat, Jason. I sold so many classes that my phone overheated.

Jason Pyles:
Wow. That’s remarkable.

Rob Booker:
Everybody in the car was like “How did you do it?” I thought to myself, it was just a class. It was just a class like I had taught in the past. There wasn’t a lot different to it, but I realize now that I reflect back on it, that this is a great example of what I like to call brand response advertising. I thought maybe we would talk about that.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah. Let’s hear it. This is interesting to me because it’s kind of bull end, right?

Rob Booker:
Yeah. Exactly. And maybe we have somebody out there listening, that’s in the world of online marketing and hopefully some of you are in the world of online marketing financial stuff. Like trading related products, options and stocks and whatever else, but whatever you do is fine. Maybe you would like to try some of this stuff out. Maybe it would work for you or maybe it won’t work for you. By the way, Jason, we really don’t have anything for sale for anybody.

Jason Pyles:
That’s true.

Rob Booker:
We don’t really care about that. You and I are here because we enjoy our listeners and we enjoy bringing happiness to the earlobes of people everywhere.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah. That’s exactly why we do it.

Rob Booker:
Our purpose here really isn’t economic is it?

Jason Pyles:
No. It’s pretty altruistic actually, Rob.

Rob Booker:
Yeah. We provide … It’s difficult to explain, is it not? You do a horror movie podcast with no financial reward whatsoever.

Jason Pyles:
Right. To speak of, yes.

Rob Booker:
But it’s one of the most wonderful parts of your life.

Jason Pyles:
It’s very fun.

Rob Booker:
Alright. That’s number one on the list. Number one of the list is I didn’t launch that class to make money. I launched that class because I had something to say that I couldn’t keep inside. That sounds weird because it was a class about trading the currency market and I called it Trifecta. It sounds really odd for someone to say “I had this burning desire to talk about the Mexican Peso.” It sounds weird but I was really passionate about this. I remembered just wanting to have an outlet for this information. I don’t know if it was altruistic fully, but I wasn’t doing it with an economic goal in mind. I was doing it because I had to say it.

The first law that is broken in so much online marketing, and especially online marketing in the world of trading in the financial markets, is that people are launching classes or teaching things with a very specific economic and financial purpose in mind. Sometimes they try to hide it and sometimes it’s disguised or thinly disguised or whatever. But there’s always this absolute surety and certainty that the person that is selling the class wants to make money. There are very few exceptions to this. However, the people making the big money or the easy money or the people that have clients or customers lining up around the block, like they’re buying an iPhone, have some other kind of obvious purpose. That obvious purpose is “I love what I am doing and I would be doing it even if it didn’t pay me anything.”

That doesn’t mean it’s free. The iPhone isn’t free but the people who make the iPhone are in love with making iPhones and shaping the glass and fitting more components inside of a smaller device. They feel like they are in a war against the other product. Are you in the world of the smart phone now?

Jason Pyles:
Yes I am actually. I had to. I’ll tell you why. Because you can’t call for an Uber from a dumb phone, which is what I had. So, one time I got stuck in an airport because I didn’t have a smart phone. So I’m like, well it’s time to upgrade.

Rob Booker:
It’s when it happens, isn’t it?

Jason Pyles:
Yup. You get forced into it, Rob.

Rob Booker:
Oh that’s great. The first law is you have to want to do it so badly that you would do it even if it were free. That love of your work has to permeate down through everything that you do. It has to be obvious. It trumps everything. It trumps design. It trumps the price that you put on your product. It supersedes and is more important than whether you’re smarter than everyone else, whether your course or your class even works for every single person that buys it. You can call it enthusiasm. You could call it passion. If it’s not absolutely abundantly clear that you are incredibly passionate about that, and I’m talking about a class about trading the currency market, but if that wasn’t the first thing that was clear, then it wouldn’t matter whatever else. The message has to be this is important. Stop everything that you’re doing and pay attention. Not just because I said stop everything you’re doing and pay attention, but because the enthusiasm that comes out of my voice.

I shot out of bed like a rocket today because you and I were going to talk.

Jason Pyles:
That’s right.

Rob Booker:
I didn’t shoot out of bed today because I thought we were going to talk and then we were going to have a call to action at the end, and someone was going to buy my stuff.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
I shot out of bed because I love talking to you, Jason Pyles.

Jason Pyles:
Thank you. I’m flattered. I am. It’s so nice.

Rob Booker:
You have these insights that our listeners will hear from time to time. That’s number one on the list. You do the things that you love to do and you let that enthusiasm permeate through every single thing that you do in advance of launching that class. When I did a Facebook ad, the Facebook ad was about my enthusiasm or my anticipation for my own product. Like I was waiting for it as well. If I did a video previewing it, it wasn’t just made up enthusiasm. It wasn’t staged enthusiasm. You couldn’t deny that everything about the way that I looked and the way that I talked about, it permeated though me. If I didn’t have that, I shouldn’t have launched it. If it didn’t exist, if I wasn’t that passionate about it, then there wouldn’t have been a launch, and there shouldn’t have been a launch. That’s a huge problem in the world today of online marketing.

There’s this feeling that if I put a headline on it, and make the buy button a certain color, and if I structure the page in a certain way, and if I copy from some swipe file of some blow hard jackass that competes in my industry, if I copy his page and I copy his language and blah, blah, blah, that I ought to get the same return. What that is, that is a clear indication to everyone that hits your page, that you are absolutely selfish and you can’t disguise it. A lot of you listening to this, gosh I hate to say this, Jason.

Jason Pyles:
Well. You got to do what you got to do, Rob.

Rob Booker:
A lot of you that are listening to this, you think that you’re being genuine, but it is abundantly clear to everyone who watches you videos that you don’t really believe what you’re saying. You need to step back and you need to change the way you talk about it. Second of all, you need to be against something. If you can’t work up enthusiasm for what you have, you need to work up some kind of an argument against what other people have.

Once again, this isn’t about the headline. It’s not about the color of your button. It’s not about your pricing strategy. It’s not about having three boxes for three different tiers of pricing. It’s not about A and B split testing of your page, so you can see which page people used. By the time that shopping cart opens, you aught to be able to put a picture of a dead donkey on the page next to the buy button, and then people click on the dead donkey to buy it.

You have to generate so much enthusiasm, that if your page isn’t working or if the page is broken or if the headline, it doesn’t even exist, or if there’s a dead image link on the sales page, it doesn’t matter, because you have worked up a case or a message about why this product matters and why you love it and what you are so strongly against that this product solves. That you are against complexity. That you are against expensive solutions to the problem. That you are against selling call options for premium because that’s a stupid idea and everybody thinks it’s a great idea. Then you go on a ten minute rant about why that’s a stupid idea.

On that note, Jason, if you’re listening right now, and you’re tired of all the marketing products and the marketing bull, you can bleep that out or whatever, all that marketing crap that tells you that if you have a certain structure, if you do this twelve point video sales letter, if you have a certain funnel that has a page here and a page here and then a one sell and a double click down sell, and a double three payment offer. If you’re tired of that, if that sounds complicated, let me offer some hope to you. There is an entire marketing education complex that has built a multi million dollar industry. Thirty million dollars a year, one company. Three hundred million dollars in another company, that’s located in … Well, I’m not going to say where they’re located but these companies are built on the idea that you will fall for the fact that if you just change the nature of the headline, you’re going to be making more money. If you just split test your pages, you’re going to be making more money. That’s a giant lie.

If you are authentic and if you emanate enthusiasm and if you stand against something, you are creating a brand. If you put a buy button on a page, you’re asking for a response to your brand. That’s brand response. If you don’t take the time to build the brand for a product that you’re launching or a service that you offer, if you don’t take the time to state for and what you are clearly against, then you have not asked people to take sides. If you haven’t asked them to chose a side, you don’t have a brand. If you don’t have a brand, you’re not going to get a response no matter what you do.

I see people and my heart goes out to them. Some of you listening may be in this situation. I see people frantically changing the language of their sales page, changing the background image on their sales page. What they haven’t done is, they haven’t articulated a message about what is so exciting about what this is. Not because you want people to think it’s exciting. It has to flow through everything that you do. You have to want to jump out of bed in the morning. You have to tell people in the grocery store about it. That’s how exciting it has to be.

Jason Pyles:
Yes.

Rob Booker:
For example, I trade the Mexican Peso and I tell people. I say all the time, “What do you do?” I didn’t use to tell people I was a trader because it was too hard to explain. Now I tell everybody, I tell everybody around me, “I trade the Mexican Peso. I make between $100 and $500 a day trading the Mexican Peso before my kids go to school.” People are like, “What did you just say? The Mexican Peso? Do you work at the airport? What are you talking about?”

Jason Pyles:
All right.

Rob Booker:
But I can’t resist it because I love the Mexican Peso. I can’t stop talking about it. I can’t stop discussing it. It’s the same with this brand response idea. I can’t stop, Jason. If you take the time to make videos on Periscope, make videos on Facebook live, make videos on YouTube live or upload videos to YouTube, if you make a one page cheat sheet or guide, or if you write a landscape PDF, and you make it into a manifesto, where there’s a picture and paragraph and then a page where a picture and a paragraph, and you take people through a seven point manifesto. If you need an example of it, read the Unibomber manifesto, read something. Read a manifesto. Write a manifesto. And write a manifesto about what are for and what you are against, and ask people to choose a side.

If it looks like it’s staged and it looks like it’s fake, you still have a chance that it’s successful, but you’re probably going to fail. It has to come straight from the heart. The easiest way that it comes straight from the heart, the thing that you’re for and the thing that you’re against, is number three, if you’re honest.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah.

Rob Booker:
You tell people the truth. The most attractive quality in online sales today is honesty, because there’s so little of it. We are attracted to what we aspire to. What a lot of people aspire to is the peace of mind that comes from telling the truth.

Jason Pyles:
Believable.

Rob Booker:
Yeah. We admire people that are comfortable in their own skin.

Jason Pyles:
Yes.

Rob Booker:
You know one of the all time greatest people comfortable in their own skin?

Jason Pyles:
Who’s that Rob?

Rob Booker:
James McNulty.

Jason Pyles:
James McNulty.

Rob Booker:
For those of you that don’t know who that is, that’s Officer McNulty from The Wire.

Jason Pyles:
Right. Greatest TV show ever.

Rob Booker:
Yeah. Unapologetically, all about the job. Unapologetically, on a mission from God for justice, against Stringer Bell. It started of as Avon Barksdale and went to Stringer Bell. Absolutely, unapologetically for and against something, and never dishonest about anything. There are these episodes where he openly admitted to some of the just most abhorrent behavior but he was comfortable in his own skin and it was the mission that mattered. It permeated everything that he did. They built this character that you could root for even though he was imperfect.

You’ve got to be an imperfect hero when you’re doing marketing online these days. Examples in the world trading and investing and whatever else are, you’ve got to be willing to show the mistakes that you made. Not show it for the purpose of selling something. There can’t be a call to action at the end of every stupid thing that you do. You can’t fall for this garbage. I hate to say this but Dan Kennedy is supposedly the worlds best copywriter. He’s also the world’s grumpiest old man. I don’t want to say any bad words on this podcast, but he’s a jerk. He’s a total jerk. And he has these stupid rules that people now accept as religion, because they’ve just been published everywhere.

One of these stupid rules is always make an offer. Always make an offer. Well, you know what it feels like if your friend always makes you an offer?

Jason Pyles:
Hmm. Yeah. It feels like they’re just trying to get something out of you. Just leach out of you.

Rob Booker:
Exactly. You don’t line up around the block for something from a used car salesman. You never do that. You line up around the block because most people can’t get in, because there won’t be enough of what it is, because it’s so unique and it stands out that there isn’t anything like that, that you’ve ever seen before. In the world of trading, those are people that show their real accounts, that show the mistakes that they’ve made, tell a true story. Here’s a true story, Jason.

Jason Pyles:
Ready.

Rob Booker:
I do online marketing in my own business for traders. I sell stuff to traders. I am a trader and run robots and trade the Mexican Peso. I’ve had an online business for the last, it’s a long time now, 16 years doing this. I’m totally lost right now. I got into this thing in the beginning of 2017, where I was subscribing to these marketing newsletters and talking to my friends that do online marketing. Jason, I just got lost. I got lost in all this advice. I got lost in all these different things that you can do. My sales suffered and I got scared. I got to the point where I was … I hate to say this but it’s even recently where I’m like, “What am I doing wrong?”

Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve had this realization that I got away from this brand response model, where I provide value, show enthusiasm for what I’m for, stand against something that I hate, and then I let people in. I let down the guard and I let people in and show people what’s really going on. That’s the harder path to take because at the end of that path, where’s the class?

Jason Pyles:
Yeah.

Rob Booker:
Where’s the money?

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
If you’re asking that question, I love you. Thanks for asking that question, but you missed the point at the very beginning of the episode. The point wasn’t the money. The point was taking good care of people that you bring into your sphere of influence. That’s the point. If you have provided value around a specific idea and you have stood for that idea, you have taken a stand against whatever is outside of that idea, you have asked people to choose sides and then you have let people in to know who you are. You can put a webpage up with an early bird list, with an email blank and a button that says product X is coming.

You can even call it product X at that point. If you have built a brand and told a story and stood against something and stood up for something and let people in, that’s all that page has to have. And people will get on the early bird list. If the email’s that go out, instead of selling people the seven points of why you should do this, or the old here’s the logical reason you should buy it, and here’s the emotional reason you should buy it, and here’s the fear based reason. If you throw away all that garbage, and you just let people in after that, with videos or PDFs, whatever it is, if you just let people in and you show that enthusiasm, they will get excited for whatever it is to come, even if you don’t even tell them what it is.

Jason Pyles:
That’s interesting. That’s really fascinating.

Rob Booker:
Because they trust you. Then it can be a two part course, a two part video course. It could be an email that you send out as a class once a week. It could be a Facebook group that they buy access to. It could be a live event. If you think that you’ve launched the wrong kind of product, you’ve missed the point. “Oh, I shouldn’t have done a live event. Live events are difficult.” Or “I shouldn’t have done a webinar. That’s really difficult these days.” Or “Webinars aren’t selling well.” No, dishonestly isn’t selling well these days. The market’s crowded. Being boring isn’t selling well these days because being boring sucks.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
First you have to stand for something, stand against something and you have to let people in. Then you just need an early bird list with a button. You need to tell them something is coming. You need to wrap something up in a box and put in on the table in a room where everyone can see it. Everybody walks by that table and they see a box wrapped up with a bow. And what are they thinking?

Jason Pyles:
What’s inside?

Rob Booker:
What’s in the box?

Jason Pyles:
Yes.

Rob Booker:
Exactly. If they know you as the kind of person that wraps up special stuff, and you know who you are and always tells people the truth, they’re going to want to know what’s inside that box. If you’re a snake oil salesman and if you are clearly in it for the money, they’re going to know that inside that box is a sales pitch. Nobody wants a sales pitch.

Jason Pyles:
Exactly.

Rob Booker:
So in the mind of a listener, Jason, do you think are any questions that pop up as we talk about this stuff?

Jason Pyles:
Yeah. I do actually, Rob. I think if I were listening to this, one question I might ask is “How do I zero in on what my passion would be or what I need to sell? How do I figure out what that thing is to get excited about and passionate about?”

Rob Booker:
You’re always doing whatever it is that you want.

Jason Pyles:
That’s what my wife says about me, yes.

Rob Booker:
Well, you and I are cut from the same cloth, my friend.

Jason Pyles:
Yes we are.

Rob Booker:
It’s hard for some people to hear this but some people are in the world of marketing and they’re selling something because they’ve been told that’s what will sell. There’s no passion behind it. There’s no success behind it. Some people actually get in the market and say ” I don’t know what I should sell yet. I’m trying to find something that will sell well.” They read these classes about, you search for the keywords and see what people are buying right now. That’s backing into something that you’re not really passionate about. Where do you spend all your time? What are you doing all the time? What is it that you do more honestly than anyone else? Some people sell stuff in the world of trading and investing because they think that’s a path to money, but they don’t even have trading accounts. They’re just liars. That does happen in this world. I could even help that person sell stuff. Not that I would want to but I could even help that person sell stuff by being honest.

What is it that you’re afraid to be honest about, is what I would ask. That you love but you’re afraid to be honest about. That brings up some scary stuff.

Jason Pyles:
Yeah, I was going to say, we’re going to have a lot of interesting business ideas pop up now, Rob.

Rob Booker:
You do a movie podcast about horror movies. It’s not like everybody in your immediate life is a fan of horror movies.

Jason Pyles:
Almost nobody, in fact, in my immediate life.

Rob Booker:
Sometimes our passion is one of those things that’s not easy. You have been really successful at that podcast because you have embraced some part of yourself that’s a little bit more difficult to be honest about and admit to. It doesn’t have to be something scandalous although if it is, that’s even better.

Jason Pyles:
Right.

Rob Booker:
Find something. If you’re in the world of trading and investing, you probably are if you’re listening to this and you might be, find something scandalous, different, exciting, something that gets you up in the morning to trade. Find something that almost seems like you shouldn’t be doing it. That’s the stuff that you can wrap up and put in a box and put on the table.

Man, we have so much to talk about and it feels like this time goes by every week, so fast.

Jason Pyles:
Yes it does.

Rob Booker:
Do you have anything you want to pitch at the end of this. I want to hear what you’re working on lately.

Jason Pyles:
What I’m passionate about? Well, we do have a network of movie podcasts, Rob. That’s what my deviant passions have led me to. We got like eight or nine podcasts about different kinds of topics, like westerns, sci-fi, horror. I mean all kinds of stuff. It’s a moviepodcasts.network. That’s our crew. That’s what we do now.

Rob Booker:
Alright. That sounds great. Moviepodcasts.network. The Unforgiven is my favorite western. I know there’s a lot of other ones out there.

Jason Pyles:
Oh yeah. That’s fantastic. In fact, it won best picture in 1992. Great pick.

Rob Booker:
Yeah. One of my favorites of all time. Alright everybody check out moviepodcasts.network. That’s Jason Pyles deviant side passion and it’s pretty awesome. I think we should have story time next time we come back. Everyone don’t forget to click subscribe, like, follow, wherever you are, wherever delicious podcasts are consumed. We will be back next week if we can. We ought to tell maybe a shocking story about deviant financial market marketing behavior?

Jason Pyles:
Yes. I love stuff like this.

Rob Booker:
Alright. If you like that, then subscribe and your podcast app will let you know when the next episode comes out. Jason, it’s always a pleasure to talk to you.

Jason Pyles:
Yes thanks Rob. I was an honor to be here.

Rob Booker:
See you later, everybody. Bye for now.

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